Pitch and Bank Angle Control

Although XC training in Condor can be done in a manner very similar to training in Real Life (RL), that does not take full advantage of Condor’s many unique features.  For instance, since the instructor can specify which glider is to be used for training from a large range, it makes sense to specify one that makes it easiest to teach basic pitch and bank angle control.  In particular, the Schempp-Hirth Discus 2 glider with it’s distinctive angular instrument panel glareshield, makes this concept much easier to get across, and consequently, accurate pitch and bank angle control can become a more central part of XC training.

Right45Bank1 300x166 Pitch and Bank Angle Control
Discus 2 in a right 45 degree bank, with correct pitch for 45kts
D2StraightLevel1 300x187 Pitch and Bank Angle Control
Discus 2 straight and level
Left45Bank1 300x160 Pitch and Bank Angle Control
Discus 2 in a left 45 degree bank, with correct pitch for 45kts
The above screenshots show a Schempp-Hirth Discus 2 glider in a 45º right bank, straight-and-level, and a 45º left bank.  
In a right thermalling turn, the left slanted side of the glareshield (near the turn-bank and the Winter vario) should be parallel to the horizon, and the upper right-hand corner (the junction between the right slanted side and the flat top, above the PDA) should be close to the horizon.  This will result in a 45º bank angle, and an airspeed of about 45kts.  This is pretty much the optimum configuration for thermalling.
In a left thermalling turn, the right slanted side of the glareshield (just above the PDA) should be parallel to the horizon, and the upper left-hand corner (the junction between the left slanted side and the flat top, above the Winter vario) should be close to the horizon.   This will result in a 45º bank angle, and an airspeed of about 45kts.  This is pretty much the optimum configuration for thermalling.
It should be stressed when working with a new student that the airspeed indicator (ASI) is not the primary reference instrument for airspeed control – it is the glareshield!  The ASI should be monitored occasionally, but if the glareshield is in the right place, then the ASI will follow like night follows day.
After a student has thoroughly learned the value of using the horizon and the Discus 2 glareshield for pitch and bank angle control, then transferring that skill to other aircraft will be much easier.
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